Common Sense Media Says: Pause for kids 12 & under

007's silver screen debut with action and bikinis.


What Parents need to know

Parents need to know that Dr. No is the first James Bond 007 movie, from 1962. It contains fighting, shooting, and killing, with a little blood shown. It's relatively tame today, but was arguably among the more violent movies made in 1962. Though Bond is a hero, striving to solve problems and protect the world from evil, his methods are questionable. He has a "license to kill," he seduces several women (no nudity shown), drinks, smokes cigarettes, gambles, and generally bosses people around. Despite all this, he projects an image of cool confidence, and he has fascinated generations of action movie fans. Since the series is still ongoing 50 years later, teens will be interested in going back to see earlier entries.

Consumerism:A bottle of Smirnoff vodka is shown, and we see several crates of Red Stripe beer (in Jamaica).


Drinking, drugs, & smoking:Bond is shown smoking a cigarette the first time he appears on camera (he makes it look cool). Many characters smoke in a background, casual way. Bond drinks his trademark vodka martini, and a secondary character is shown drinking a little too much rum. There are many other scenes of characters drinking socially.


Language:"Hell" is used more than once, and "damn" is heard once.


Positive messages:Bond is a force for good, working to solve problems and protect the world from evil criminals, but he specifically works for the British government and his loyalty is to them. His methods are also questionable.


Positive role models:Though Bond is a highly skilled hero, dedicated to solving problems around the world, his methods involve killing (for which he has a license), seducing many women, drinking, smoking cigarettes, gambling, and generally bossing people around.


Sex:Bond seduces and sleeps with more than one woman, without repercussions. There's kissing, scantily clad women, and sexual innuendo.


Violence:Several characters are shot and killed. Some blood is shown, but not much. There's also a good deal of fighting. A character commits suicide. There's a flaming car crash. One character is burned alive, though it is not graphically depicted.



What's the story?

James Bond (Sean Connery), is a British Secret Service agent who has been called upon to investigate suspicious activity in Jamaica. With the help of an earthy Jamaican (John Kitzmiller) and an American CIA agent (Jack Lord), Bond attempts to unravel the mystery of who or what is interfering with rocket launches in the States.

Is it any good?

Not quite as streamlined or cohesive as many of its successors, DR. NO introduces James Bond, one of the most enduring figure of Western cinema, to the world. Considering how many sequels this modest action-spy film spawned, it's worth asking why this refined rou has stuck around as long as he has.The answer, for better or worse, probably lies in the unapologetic way the film plays to undomesticated male fantasies. The action is wooden and the plot contrived, but it sure is fun to look at.